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ASU's criminal justice online graduate degree program ranks in US News' top 10

The online master’s degree program in criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University continues for an eighth consecutive year as one of the nation’s top 10 such courses of study, according to U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings announced. The online Master of Arts degree program earned a No. 7 ranking for 2022.

ASU’s No. 7 ranking is higher than those of the University of Cincinnati, the University of Nebraska-Omaha, the University of Central Florida and the University of Oklahoma.

Prospects of conducting exciting research influenced grad to study criminal justice

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2021 graduates.

When Abiud Hernandez-Garcia began studying criminology and criminal justice at ASU, he thought he wanted to be a police officer. But the Avondale, Arizona, resident said he was never quite convinced it was the correct career path for him.

How 9/11 changed the ways these faculty teach and research

From the global response to terrorism and the subversive weaponization of narratives, to the evolution of crisis management and guardians of civil liberties — 9/11 forced us to think differently; to rise to new challenges; and to confront the vulnerabilities of our democracy.

Twenty years after the attacks and in observance of the anniversary, ASU News reached out to faculty experts across Arizona State University to share their observations, research and reflections on 9/11’s cultural and global impact on our world — and on their work.

Law enforcement veered away from community policing after 9/11 attacks

Twenty years ago, the country saw images of police officers heroically running into buildings that would soon come crashing down.

But over the past few years, people have seen uglier images of police officers abusing their power.

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 changed policing in America, according to William Terrill, professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

And now, he said, policing seems to be pivoting again.

New scholarship to assist graduate students' work at ASU Center for Correctional Solutions

Jeff McClelland was a dedicated and accomplished executive at the time of his death in 2006. A new scholarship his family has established in his name honors his great respect for higher education and demonstrates their commitment to the criminal justice profession.

Each year the Jeffrey D. McClelland Scholarship will support a graduate student working in the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions-based Center for Correctional Solutions at Arizona State University.

SCCJ degree program rises to No. 2 nationwide in U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate Schools rankings

ASU’s doctoral program in criminology rose to No. 2 nationwide in the prestigious 2022 Best Graduate Schools Rankings announced today by U.S. News & World Report.

The program, in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (SCCJ) at the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, held the No. 5 position in 2021. The publication has ranked the program in the top five nationally since 2018.

Grad's fascination with criminal justice began with 'Law & Order' and led to a degree

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2020 graduates.

Ever since she was very young, Alexis Klemm was fascinated by the study of the mind and human actions. That captivation first came from watching TV dramas such as “Law & Order” and “Criminal Minds.” Then, as a middle and high school student, she began taking courses in psychology, forensic sciences and sociology.

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