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ASU's criminal justice online graduate degree program ranks in US News' top 10

The online master’s degree program in criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University continues for an eighth consecutive year as one of the nation’s top 10 such courses of study, according to U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings announced. The online Master of Arts degree program earned a No. 7 ranking for 2022.

ASU’s No. 7 ranking is higher than those of the University of Cincinnati, the University of Nebraska-Omaha, the University of Central Florida and the University of Oklahoma.

Prospects of conducting exciting research influenced grad to study criminal justice

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2021 graduates.

When Abiud Hernandez-Garcia began studying criminology and criminal justice at ASU, he thought he wanted to be a police officer. But the Avondale, Arizona, resident said he was never quite convinced it was the correct career path for him.

ASU professor finds lack of empathy in police statements after killings

Expressions of empathy can be healing not only between two people but also between groups.

A new research study by an Arizona State University criminology professor finds that empathy is rarely expressed by criminal justice officials in the aftermath of police killings of unarmed African Americans, potentially missing an opportunity to ease tensions.

Departing criminal justice school director looks toward its next triumphs

Only a year and a half have gone by since Jon Gould arrived at Arizona State University, but as he leaves for California, he said the school he has headed is in excellent shape and poised to do even greater things in the near future.

Gould, a Foundation Professor who has been director of ASU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice since January 2020, will be the new dean of the School of Social Ecology at the University of California, Irvine. His last day working at ASU is Oct. 5.

Law enforcement veered away from community policing after 9/11 attacks

Twenty years ago, the country saw images of police officers heroically running into buildings that would soon come crashing down.

But over the past few years, people have seen uglier images of police officers abusing their power.

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 changed policing in America, according to William Terrill, professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

And now, he said, policing seems to be pivoting again.

ASU research finds greater likelihood of false guilty pleas during pandemic

Like everything else, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused upheaval in the criminal justice system, with disruptions in trials and outbreaks among incarcerated people.

A new research paper by an Arizona State University professor uses a new computer simulation software to quantify one of the pandemic’s effects: a greater likelihood that people who are detained before trial will plead guilty in order get out of jail and avoid exposure to COVID-19 — even if they are innocent.

ASU school renames Alumni Scholar Award for retired Professor John R. Hepburn

ASU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice has renamed the annual Alumni Scholar Award for a distinguished member of its faculty who retired this spring.

The Dr. John R. Hepburn Alumni Scholar Award was renamed at the request of the faculty. It is an annual award presented for outstanding scholarly contributions to the discipline of criminology and criminal justice by a recipient of a MA, MS, or PhD degree from the school.

New scholarship to assist graduate students' work at ASU Center for Correctional Solutions

Jeff McClelland was a dedicated and accomplished executive at the time of his death in 2006. A new scholarship his family has established in his name honors his great respect for higher education and demonstrates their commitment to the criminal justice profession.

Each year the Jeffrey D. McClelland Scholarship will support a graduate student working in the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions-based Center for Correctional Solutions at Arizona State University.

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