School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

In open letter, SCCJ faculty makes recommendations to change relationships between law enforcement and public

Responding to recent tragic events involving African-Americans and police officers, the faculty of Arizona State University’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (SCCJ) published an open letter offering 10 far-ranging recommendations for systemic change in the relationships between law enforcement agencies and the communities they serve.

Transforming Policing and Criminal Justice: An Open Letter from Faculty Members of ASU’s School of Criminology & Criminal Justice

In the United States, managing the tensions between the privileged, politically dominant classes of society and its politically, socially and economically disadvantaged classes, to which communities of color have disproportionately belonged, has always been a central concern of police and the criminal justice system. Some U.S. police agencies were explicitly established in the Civil War era to help preserve slavery and white supremacy.

Department culture can escalate to police brutality, ASU expert says

The premature death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer caught on video May 25 raises questions as to how a call to investigate a person suspected of forgery can end up in tragedy.

In the graphic footage recorded by a bystander, a handcuffed Floyd is on the ground, face-down, and struggles to breathe as one of three officers holding him down forces his knee on Floyd’s neck for several minutes while ignoring pleas from the 46-year-old man and onlookers to stop.

Quick thinking keeps instruction going for incarcerated students in ASU's 'Inside-Out' class

The logistical challenges of teaching a class inside a state prison are complicated enough during a typical semester, let alone one that includes a pandemic.

This spring, an Arizona State University professor and a doctoral student were instructing 10 students based at the Downtown Phoenix campus, plus 10 more who happen to be men serving criminal sentences at the Arizona State Prison Complex-Florence.

Criminology outstanding grad has her 'aha' moment on visit to Arizona prison

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2020 graduates.

Genevieve McKenzie remembers the spring of her freshman year, when she questioned whether she made the right decision to major in criminology and criminal justice.

But even more vivid in her memory is the day those doubts disappeared. It was the day she sat face-to-face in an Arizona prison with an incarcerated man dressed in an orange jumpsuit.

Student profile: Hard work researching body-worn cameras’ effectiveness showed assistant how much he could accomplish

Three months before getting his bachelor’s degree, Quin Patterson had no desire to go to graduate school.

After studying at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ), part of the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, Patterson was looking forward to completing school and possibly pursuing a career in law enforcement.

Giving aid to African human trafficking victims sharpens student’s career focus toward helping others to be heard

Karla Chicuate was intellectually acquainted with the morally evil practice of grooming, abducting and selling human beings for labor or sexual exploitation when she traveled in January to west Africa.

After all, she had been working as an educator with the city of Tempe’s Sexual Relationship and Violence Department for about a year and a half when her 10-day excursion began, and she intentionally chose the assignment to work with women and children who had endured human trafficking.

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