Law

Law enforcement veered away from community policing after 9/11 attacks

Twenty years ago, the country saw images of police officers heroically running into buildings that would soon come crashing down.

But over the past few years, people have seen uglier images of police officers abusing their power.

The terrorist attacks of 9/11 changed policing in America, according to William Terrill, professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

And now, he said, policing seems to be pivoting again.

ASU research finds greater likelihood of false guilty pleas during pandemic

Like everything else, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused upheaval in the criminal justice system, with disruptions in trials and outbreaks among incarcerated people.

A new research paper by an Arizona State University professor uses a new computer simulation software to quantify one of the pandemic’s effects: a greater likelihood that people who are detained before trial will plead guilty in order get out of jail and avoid exposure to COVID-19 — even if they are innocent.

ASU Foundation awarded $250,000 grant to conduct Sentinel Event Review of police use of force

The ASU Foundation has been awarded a $250,000 grant by the American Arbitration Association – International Centre for Dispute Resolution (AAA-ICDR) Foundation to explore the development of a statewide system for conducting Sentinel Event Reviews (SER) of police use of force, particularly among vulnerable populations. The award will also fund several actual SERs to demonstrate the concept.

Transforming Policing and Criminal Justice: An Open Letter from Faculty Members of ASU’s School of Criminology & Criminal Justice

In the United States, managing the tensions between the privileged, politically dominant classes of society and its politically, socially and economically disadvantaged classes, to which communities of color have disproportionately belonged, has always been a central concern of police and the criminal justice system. Some U.S. police agencies were explicitly established in the Civil War era to help preserve slavery and white supremacy.

African-American law enforcement officers balance dual identities

African-American law enforcement officers must balance two identities simultaneously during these complicated times, and each identity serves the other, according to a panel discussion at Arizona State University on Thursday night.

Five African-American men discussed the complexity of race in their experiences as professionals in the criminal justice system in a talk titled “Being Blue from a Black Perspective” at the Beus Center for Law and Society on the Downtown Phoenix campus.

ASU Online offers the opportunity to earn degrees, advance careers

The sun-soaked campuses of Arizona State University are beautiful places to take college classes, but it’s an experience that’s not available to everyone.

Some potential students are working or taking care of families, or they’re not able to be in a classroom for health reasons. Others are on active duty in the military or running companies in other countries.

But they still deserve to earn a college degree from a prestigious institution.

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