Education

How 9/11 changed the ways these faculty teach and research

From the global response to terrorism and the subversive weaponization of narratives, to the evolution of crisis management and guardians of civil liberties — 9/11 forced us to think differently; to rise to new challenges; and to confront the vulnerabilities of our democracy.

Twenty years after the attacks and in observance of the anniversary, ASU News reached out to faculty experts across Arizona State University to share their observations, research and reflections on 9/11’s cultural and global impact on our world — and on their work.

SCCJ degree program rises to No. 2 nationwide in U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate Schools rankings

ASU’s doctoral program in criminology rose to No. 2 nationwide in the prestigious 2022 Best Graduate Schools Rankings announced today by U.S. News & World Report.

The program, in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (SCCJ) at the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, held the No. 5 position in 2021. The publication has ranked the program in the top five nationally since 2018.

Online criminal justice graduate program ranks among top 10 in U.S. for seventh consecutive year

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (SCCJ) online graduate degree program at Arizona State University continues for a seventh year as one of the nation’s top 10 such courses of study, according to U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings announced Jan. 26. The online Master of Arts degree program earned a No. 7 ranking for 2021.

Quick thinking keeps instruction going for incarcerated students in ASU's 'Inside-Out' class

The logistical challenges of teaching a class inside a state prison are complicated enough during a typical semester, let alone one that includes a pandemic.

This spring, an Arizona State University professor and a doctoral student were instructing 10 students based at the Downtown Phoenix campus, plus 10 more who happen to be men serving criminal sentences at the Arizona State Prison Complex-Florence.

ASU Online offers the opportunity to earn degrees, advance careers

The sun-soaked campuses of Arizona State University are beautiful places to take college classes, but it’s an experience that’s not available to everyone.

Some potential students are working or taking care of families, or they’re not able to be in a classroom for health reasons. Others are on active duty in the military or running companies in other countries.

But they still deserve to earn a college degree from a prestigious institution.

ASU criminology professor educates high school honor students on prison issues

Students in the BASIS Phoenix National Honor Society got an in-depth lesson on prison and prison reform from ASU criminologist Kevin Wright. An associate professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Wright was invited to the northeast Phoenix charter school by Simran Sall, a sophomore who heard Wright speak as part of a summer program with ASU’s Barrett, the Honors College.