Alumni

Transforming Policing and Criminal Justice: An Open Letter from Faculty Members of ASU’s School of Criminology & Criminal Justice

In the United States, managing the tensions between the privileged, politically dominant classes of society and its politically, socially and economically disadvantaged classes, to which communities of color have disproportionately belonged, has always been a central concern of police and the criminal justice system. Some U.S. police agencies were explicitly established in the Civil War era to help preserve slavery and white supremacy.

Quick thinking keeps instruction going for incarcerated students in ASU's 'Inside-Out' class

The logistical challenges of teaching a class inside a state prison are complicated enough during a typical semester, let alone one that includes a pandemic.

This spring, an Arizona State University professor and a doctoral student were instructing 10 students based at the Downtown Phoenix campus, plus 10 more who happen to be men serving criminal sentences at the Arizona State Prison Complex-Florence.

Criminology outstanding grad has her 'aha' moment on visit to Arizona prison

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2020 graduates.

Genevieve McKenzie remembers the spring of her freshman year, when she questioned whether she made the right decision to major in criminology and criminal justice.

But even more vivid in her memory is the day those doubts disappeared. It was the day she sat face-to-face in an Arizona prison with an incarcerated man dressed in an orange jumpsuit.

Giving aid to African human trafficking victims sharpens student’s career focus toward helping others to be heard

Karla Chicuate was intellectually acquainted with the morally evil practice of grooming, abducting and selling human beings for labor or sexual exploitation when she traveled in January to west Africa.

After all, she had been working as an educator with the city of Tempe’s Sexual Relationship and Violence Department for about a year and a half when her 10-day excursion began, and she intentionally chose the assignment to work with women and children who had endured human trafficking.

Faculty's recently published books' topics range from use of body-worn cameras to police handling protests

Several faculty members at ASU’s highly regarded School of Criminology and Criminal Justice have written recently published books on subjects ranging from the use of body-worn cameras to how police handle protest events to a look into the lives and careers of attorneys representing defendants facing the death penalty.

These books include:

ASU professor among top experts chosen to define firearm injury research agenda

Firearms are the second leading cause of death behind vehicle crashes for young people in the U.S., and gun deaths among people age 19 and younger have skyrocketed 44% since 2013, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But research into factors around firearm deaths and injuries has lagged, including how they could be prevented and who is most at risk.

School of Criminology and Criminal Justice recognizes community-engaged alumni

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University has announced its 2019 alumni awards, which this year included three categories.

Alumni Scholar Award

Presented to Associate Professor Scott Wolfe, Michigan State

For outstanding scholarly contributions to the discipline of criminology and criminal justice by a person who has received the MA, MS, or PhD from the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at ASU.

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