Research

ASU research finds greater likelihood of false guilty pleas during pandemic

Like everything else, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused upheaval in the criminal justice system, with disruptions in trials and outbreaks among incarcerated people.

A new research paper by an Arizona State University professor uses a new computer simulation software to quantify one of the pandemic’s effects: a greater likelihood that people who are detained before trial will plead guilty in order get out of jail and avoid exposure to COVID-19 — even if they are innocent.

SCCJ degree program rises to No. 2 nationwide in U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate Schools rankings

ASU’s doctoral program in criminology rose to No. 2 nationwide in the prestigious 2022 Best Graduate Schools Rankings announced today by U.S. News & World Report.

The program, in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (SCCJ) at the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, held the No. 5 position in 2021. The publication has ranked the program in the top five nationally since 2018.

ASU team analyzes data as part of state effort on missing, murdered Indigenous women

The website shows rows of faces, many smiling, of Native American women and girls in Arizona who are gone — missing or murdered. No one has seen Jamie for over a year. Priscilla was kidnapped from her home and murdered in 1984. Mary worked at the Bright Angel Lodge at the Grand Canyon when she went missing in 1957.

ASU professor studies how police officers manage heightened situations

The ongoing protests over racism in the United States have fueled conversations about the role of policing, including demands for officers to focus on “de-escalating” situations before they become violent.

William Terrill, a professor of criminology at Arizona State University, has studied police behavior and culture for more than 20 years, starting in the 1990s.

New book provides research-based strategies for law enforcement

In an age of intensified public debate about the role of police officers, more law enforcement agencies rely on evidence-based policing to help officers perform their duties.

In a new book written by faculty members, alumni and current and former doctoral students in Arizona State University's School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, authors offer fresh, research-based perspectives to help law enforcement officials make better-informed decisions about running their agencies and best apply strategies and tactics.

New analysis of firearm deaths by ASU finds most victims are suicides

More than 3,100 people in Arizona died from firearms from 2015 to 2017 and 71% of those deaths were suicides, according to a new report released by Arizona State University.

The report, presented Wednesday by the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at ASU, includes a detailed breakdown of types of firearm deaths and the victims, with the intent to use the data to prevent gun violence in Arizona.

1 in 4 Arizona suicides are domestic-violence related, ASU center finds

One in four suicides in Arizona are related to violence involving an intimate partner, according to a new report from Arizona State University’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety.

The center is based at ASU’s Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions. October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

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