Convocation

Grad's fascination with criminal justice began with 'Law & Order' and led to a degree

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2020 graduates.

Ever since she was very young, Alexis Klemm was fascinated by the study of the mind and human actions. That captivation first came from watching TV dramas such as “Law & Order” and “Criminal Minds.” Then, as a middle and high school student, she began taking courses in psychology, forensic sciences and sociology.

Criminology outstanding grad has her 'aha' moment on visit to Arizona prison

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2020 graduates.

Genevieve McKenzie remembers the spring of her freshman year, when she questioned whether she made the right decision to major in criminology and criminal justice.

But even more vivid in her memory is the day those doubts disappeared. It was the day she sat face-to-face in an Arizona prison with an incarcerated man dressed in an orange jumpsuit.

Book that outstanding grad read as a teen led her to seek a criminology career

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2019 commencement.

College students often have doubts, and Brittny Dwyer is no different. In fact, she recalls struggling during her junior year with feelings of inadequacy, belying the passion and drive that eventually would earn her the title of 2019 Outstanding Graduate for the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

Criminology graduate applies desire to help others to improving criminal justice system

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

Shayla Fordyce always knew she wanted to go into the social sciences and work with people. As an undergrad in sociology, she took an “Intro to Criminology” class as an elective one semester, which inspired her to pursue her master’s degree in criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University.

ASU public service graduates asked to wield power with a 'sense of purpose'

The 350 graduates who participated in Arizona State University's College of Public Service and Community Solutions Convocation received more than recognition for their degrees Tuesday night at Comerica Theatre in downtown Phoenix. They got a reminder from their dean, Jonathan Koppell, of the power they will hold as public servants. 

Citing recent revelations regarding sexual harrassment in multiple industries, Koppell told graduates they can't ignore matters of this importance hoping they will go away. 

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