Downtown Phoenix campus

Criminology graduate applies desire to help others to improving criminal justice system

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

Shayla Fordyce always knew she wanted to go into the social sciences and work with people. As an undergrad in sociology, she took an “Intro to Criminology” class as an elective one semester, which inspired her to pursue her master’s degree in criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University.

ASU hosts conference to reduce violence in Latin America and the Caribbean

Criminal justice experts from the Western Hemisphere will examine the impact of violence in Latin America and the Caribbean and how to prevent it at a two-day conference held at the Arizona State University Tempe campus April 11–12. The free event is sponsored by the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety, part of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at ASU in downtown Phoenix.

Early results from youth survey find worrying trends on guns, drugs

Preliminary results from a survey of youths in Arizona show worrying trends concerning gun violence and drug use, according to a presentation at Arizona State University on Friday.

Every two years, about 60,000 eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders across the state take the Arizona Youth Survey, answering dozens of questions about substance use, gang involvement, bullying, violence, texting while driving and other risky behaviors.

ASU public service programs rise in the rankings

U.S. News and World Report ranked Arizona State University’s graduate degree programs within the College of Public Service and Community Solutions among some of the best in the nation.  

The ASU School of Criminology and Criminal Justice graduate criminology program is ranked No. 5 in the nation, tied with three other programs. The doctoral program launched in 2008. Its online criminal justice graduate program also ranked fifth in the 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings of online graduate degrees.

ASU public service graduates asked to wield power with a 'sense of purpose'

The 350 graduates who participated in Arizona State University's College of Public Service and Community Solutions Convocation received more than recognition for their degrees Tuesday night at Comerica Theatre in downtown Phoenix. They got a reminder from their dean, Jonathan Koppell, of the power they will hold as public servants. 

Citing recent revelations regarding sexual harrassment in multiple industries, Koppell told graduates they can't ignore matters of this importance hoping they will go away. 

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