Student

Giving aid to African human trafficking victims sharpens student’s career focus toward helping others to be heard

Karla Chicuate was intellectually acquainted with the morally evil practice of grooming, abducting and selling human beings for labor or sexual exploitation when she traveled in January to west Africa.

After all, she had been working as an educator with the city of Tempe’s Sexual Relationship and Violence Department for about a year and a half when her 10-day excursion began, and she intentionally chose the assignment to work with women and children who had endured human trafficking.

Faculty's recently published books' topics range from use of body-worn cameras to police handling protests

Several faculty members at ASU’s highly regarded School of Criminology and Criminal Justice have written recently published books on subjects ranging from the use of body-worn cameras to how police handle protest events to a look into the lives and careers of attorneys representing defendants facing the death penalty.

These books include:

Book that outstanding grad read as a teen led her to seek a criminology career

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall 2019 commencement.

College students often have doubts, and Brittny Dwyer is no different. In fact, she recalls struggling during her junior year with feelings of inadequacy, belying the passion and drive that eventually would earn her the title of 2019 Outstanding Graduate for the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

1 in 4 Arizona suicides are domestic-violence related, ASU center finds

One in four suicides in Arizona are related to violence involving an intimate partner, according to a new report from Arizona State University’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety.

The center is based at ASU’s Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions. October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

ASU students organize art show to connect prison inmates to community

Even as they are separated from their communities, the men who are incarcerated at the Arizona State Prison Complex in Florence are finding a way to give back, with help from Arizona State University.

Two ASU students have organized a gallery show of art made by the men, and sales will benefit a nonprofit that provides art therapy to traumatized children.

“Inkcarcerated: Creativity Within Confinement” will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, at the A.E. England Building at ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus.

ASU works inside prisons, out in community on incarceration solutions

Momentum is beginning to shift toward addressing the effects of mass incarceration, and Arizona State University has several initiatives to address the growing concern over the fate of people in prison, how it affects their families and what happens when they rejoin society.

The programs in the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions work inside the prisons and in the community and involve undergraduates, grad students and the public:

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