ASU School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
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Cody W. Telep

Faculty Profile: Cody W. Telep

Criminology and Criminal Justice

 

Cody_Telep Office: UCENT 611A
Phone: 602-496-2356
Email: cody.telep@asu.edu

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 Vita | Google Scholar

Assistant Professor
Emory University, B.A.
University of Maryland, M.A.
George Mason University, Ph.D.

ASU at the Downtown Campus
Criminology and Criminal Justice
411 N. Central Ave. Ste. 600
Phoenix, AZ 85004

 

Cody W. Telep is an assistant professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University in May 2013. While at George Mason, he worked as a research associate at the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy. His research interests include evaluating innovations in policing, police legitimacy, evidence-based policy, and experimental criminology.

 


 

Courses taught:

  • CRJ 201 Crime Control Policies

 


 

Recent Publications:

  •  Telep, C. W., Mitchell, R. J., & Weisburd, D. (In press). How much time should the police  spend at crime hot spots?: Answers from a police agency directed randomized field trial in Sacramento, California. Justice Quarterly.
  •  Weisburd, D., Telep, C. W., & Lawton, B. A. (In press). Could innovations in policing have contributed to the New York City crime drop even in a period of declining police strength?: The case of stop, question and frisk as a hot spots policing strategy. Justice Quarterly.
  • Telep, C. W., & Weisburd, D. (2012). What is known about the effectiveness of police practices in reducing crime and disorder? Police Quarterly, 15(4), 331–357.
  • Lum, C., Telep, C. W., Koper, C., & Grieco, J. (2012). Receptivity to research in policing. Justice Research and Policy, 14(1), 61–95. 
  • Telep, C. W. (2011). The impact of higher education on police officer attitudes towards abuse  of authority. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 22(3), 392–419.

 

Professional and Academic Affiliations:

  • American Society of Criminology
  • Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
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